vogue

Vogue International

Before it’s in fashion, it’s in Vogue—stories from emerging talent around the world, told in six posts, curated by Vogue teams globally.

6 of 6 “The great thing with henna is that it’s temporary so you can go crazy,” says handbag designer, chiropractor and henna artist Azra (@dr.azra ). “We also invite henna artists to help us celebrate before Eid, which is basically like a three-day Muslim Christmas, a very family-centered holiday that happens twice a year,” she explains. “It’s all about eating, drinking tea, playing cards and relaxing.” ⠀ For this August’s Eid al-Adha, “On the first day in the morning, we went to the eight prayers. The practice is usually done outdoors. At sunrise, you see thousands of people dressed up and gathered together for a 10-minute prayer outside. It’s really an amazing experience to see everybody together from all different walks of life.” ⠀ See @dr.azra ’s story from earlier this week on @vogue.
5 of 6 Follow Dubai-based chiropractor, artist and designer @dr.azra ’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ “A lot of the designs I do are very much mood-based. I’m also inspired by online trends. There’s a been a huge baby hair trend recently, but I can’t do it because I cover my hair, so I hennaed baby hair on my hands instead.”
4 of 6 Follow Dubai-based chiropractor, artist and designer @dr.azra ’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ “Henna is an old cultural tradition in the Arab world and a part of my life. I first did traditional Emirati designs, like the Rawayeb, which is henna on the tips of the fingers, and the Rubeya, which is the circle on the palm. Then I experimented with Libyan and Tunisian designs. ⠀ “Henna also has a lot of healing benefits, but it’s one of those things which has been lost with the generations. People love seeing henna being brought back, it reminds them of their grandmothers. It’s nostalgic and it’s beautiful.”
3 of 6 Follow Dubai-based chiropractor, artist and designer @dr.azra ’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ “Henna is an old cultural tradition in the Arab world and a part of my life. I first did traditional Emirati designs, like the Rawayeb, which is henna on the tips of the fingers, and the Rubeya, which is the circle on the palm. Then I experimented with Libyan and Tunisian designs. “Henna also has a lot of healing benefits, but it’s one of those things which has been lost with the generations. People love seeing henna being brought back, it reminds them of their grandmothers. It’s nostalgic and it’s beautiful.” ⠀ Produced by Jullz Bek.
2 of 6 Follow Dubai-based chiropractor, artist and designer @dr.azra ’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ “I like to explore different Emirati henna traditions and give them a contemporary spin, including geometric lines, optical illusions and minimalism. ⠀ “I was obsessed with crescent moons, so I drew some on my hands and managed to get a perfectly balanced map so that the hands look like textiles.”
1 of 6 Chiropractor, artist and handbag designer Azra Khamissa (@dr.azra ) couldn’t choose just one profession. “Everything I do is somehow a family affair,” she says. “My father is a chiropractor and as a kid my grandmother taught me how to sew, so I would stitch my own clothes. Then I started liking henna through Emirati henna traditions.” ⠀ Azra was 12 years old when she moved to the United Arab Emirates from Canada. After studying chiropractic in Australia, she settled in Dubai. “In Greek, chiro means hands, so chiropractic actually means hands practice. There’s definitely a link between my job as a chiropractor and henna,” Azra, now 30, explains. “Chiropractic is a way to escape from the fashion world, and the henna has always been a passion and an expression, so my jobs all tie in.” ⠀ Follow Dubai-based chiropractor, artist and designer @dr.azra ’s story this week on @vogue.
6 of 6 These days, Pilar (@pilar_zeta ) is heading to her local roller skating disco. “I’ve been going on Tuesdays here in Portland. The energy of the people dancing and having fun, I love it. They put on 70s music and you just roller skate,” says the creative director. ⠀ She also recently collaborated on an album with her husband, who is a music producer. “We have a studio [in our home] and we wanted to do a project together for a long time,” she says. “We worked in the studio for a year – just for fun – and he turned it into an album. It was an awesome experience because I was able to channel these ideas I had into sounds.” ⠀ See Argentinian creative director @pilar_zeta ’s story from earlier this week on @vogue.
5 of 6 Follow Argentinian creative director @pilar_zeta ’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ “I think the process of letting go helped me create awesome work that I wouldn't have thought would even be possible. I learned to let go of my ego and understand that a lot of this work is not for me. You have to bring the best of the collaborators’ ideas with the aesthetic.” ⠀ “Stress is constant in everybody. I find that's the first thing you need to work on before you take any creative process. If you remove the stress then it's just a fun adventure.”
4 of 6 Follow Argentinian creative director @pilar_zeta ’s story this week on @vogue and @voguemagazine. ⠀ “I try to create things that are out of this world. How could I spice it up? How could I make it more fun? I think the fun aspect is very important for my work. Not take everything so seriously, you know?”
3 of 6 Follow Argentinian creative director @pilar_zeta ’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ “My first big job was doing art direction for Coldplay. When I moved to Los Angeles around seven years ago, I signed with an agency called Maavven. The founder sent a weekly email newsletter to all of her contacts with an image that one of her artists created – no name attached, just an image. Coldplay’s manager received it and asked to meet me. ⠀ “It happened so quickly. It was for their album ‘A Head Full of Dreams’. It was scary because I really had no experience in creating the type of artwork they asked me to do: something handmade. We still work together now, five years later.”
2 of 6 Follow Argentinian creative director @pilar_zeta ’s story this week on @vogue. ⠀ How do you stay in a creative flow? Share in the comments. ⠀ “I started meditating when I was 16. I was a very confused teenager and my mom sent me to Transcendental Meditation. This was 18 years ago and it was a rare thing in Argentina, where I grew up. ⠀ “When I meditate I feel like I can shut off all the information I’m receiving constantly and find a center place to be in a creative flow.”
1 of 6 Pilar Zeta’s (@pilar_zeta ) work is a reflection of the basic human need for connection. “The most important ritual for me is feeling grateful, and I do it as soon as I wake up,” she says. “Gratitude for my family, my health, the opportunity to do creative work. I connect with myself before connecting with others.” ⠀ The self-taught creative director counts Coldplay and Katy Perry as clients, and often works between design, fashion, and music. “I’ve always found the idea of connecting music with a visual language fascinating,” says Pilar, who lives in Portland, Oregon and travels to Los Angeles frequently. “When you look at album artwork or a music video, it can communicate the language of music because seemingly unrelated worlds begin to merge and become one.” ⠀ @pilar_zeta was selected for @vogue by our team at @voguemagazine. Follow Argentinian creative director @pilar_zeta ’s story this week on @vogue.
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